Google’s Bard YouTube extension just got a lot smarter

[ad_1] To try it out, I put Bard on a YouTube video that I regularly refer to for spiritual guidance: America’s Test Kitchen’s recipe for an Espresso Martini.…

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To try it out, I put Bard on a YouTube video that I regularly refer to for spiritual guidance: America’s Test Kitchen’s recipe for an Espresso Martini. Seriously, it’s really good. I often find myself in my kitchen with half the ingredients in a cocktail shaker, trying to remember how much Benedictine to add, and then rewatching the video to figure it out. But with Bard on the case, all I have to do is type a few directions and viola – I have the full list of ingredients and some step-by-step instructions.

Bard got all the crucial points right when summarizing the video: the ingredients and measurements are all accurate, and the instructions are correct. It even includes the first step of chilling a martini glass by filling it with ice and water. The only thing that isn’t quite right is that it says to shake the drink for 30 seconds. The video definitely does not demonstrate or advise you to shake it for that long. But in general? Yes, well done Bard.

Here’s the problem, though. America’s Test Kitchen has already done that published the full recipe on his website — it’s just behind a paywall, like much of their content. The YouTube video does not include the recipe in the video description. By watching the YouTube video every time I make the espresso martini, presumably it’s there some value to go back to ATK for that content. By having Bard spit out the recipe for me, I just skipped the step where I press play, watch a pre-roll addition, and see the channel’s other recommended videos at the end. That’s great for me, but probably not so good for the video publisher.

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Bard is able to summarize the key points in the video and answers this question about ingredients accurately.

At this time, this feature only exists as an opt-in Labs experience, and it will take some work to find the answer you’re looking for. When I asked for the “full recipe” from the video, Bard was unable to generate anything. But when I asked for “step-by-step instructions” on a subsequent prompt, I was given the entire recipe.

With so much friction, there’s probably no danger to ATK’s YouTube strategy at the moment. But it’s not hard to imagine a future where this tool exists within YouTube, and at that point there’s another conversation to be had about how the value of Bard scraping a video’s content could benefit creators – at the moment the only clear advantage is for Google. Are nothing new for generative AI, but it’s a question that everyone in the industry – including Google – hasn’t yet found an answer to. We’ve reached out to Google for clarification on this and will update this article with their response. Either way, if it wants YouTube creators to happily produce content for its platform, Google will eventually have to figure that out.

Update November 22 2:55 PM ET: A note has been added that we have contacted Google to request an explanation on the potential impact on YouTube creators.

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Google’s Bard YouTube extension just got a lot smarter

[ad_1] To try it out, I put Bard on a YouTube video that I regularly refer to for spiritual guidance: America’s Test Kitchen’s recipe for an Espresso Martini.…

[ad_1]

To try it out, I put Bard on a YouTube video that I regularly refer to for spiritual guidance: America’s Test Kitchen’s recipe for an Espresso Martini. Seriously, it’s really good. I often find myself in my kitchen with half the ingredients in a cocktail shaker, trying to remember how much Benedictine to add, and then rewatching the video to figure it out. But with Bard on the case, all I have to do is type a few directions and viola – I have the full list of ingredients and some step-by-step instructions.

Bard got all the crucial points right when summarizing the video: the ingredients and measurements are all accurate, and the instructions are correct. It even includes the first step of chilling a martini glass by filling it with ice and water. The only thing that isn’t quite right is that it says to shake the drink for 30 seconds. The video definitely does not demonstrate or advise you to shake it for that long. But in general? Yes, well done Bard.

Here’s the problem, though. America’s Test Kitchen has already done that published the full recipe on his website — it’s just behind a paywall, like much of their content. The YouTube video does not include the recipe in the video description. By watching the YouTube video every time I make the espresso martini, presumably it’s there some value to go back to ATK for that content. By having Bard spit out the recipe for me, I just skipped the step where I press play, watch a pre-roll addition, and see the channel’s other recommended videos at the end. That’s great for me, but probably not so good for the video publisher.

Also Read:
Stable Video Diffusion Excellence: A Deep Dive into Synthesis

Bard is able to summarize the key points in the video and answers this question about ingredients accurately.

At this time, this feature only exists as an opt-in Labs experience, and it will take some work to find the answer you’re looking for. When I asked for the “full recipe” from the video, Bard was unable to generate anything. But when I asked for “step-by-step instructions” on a subsequent prompt, I was given the entire recipe.

With so much friction, there’s probably no danger to ATK’s YouTube strategy at the moment. But it’s not hard to imagine a future where this tool exists within YouTube, and at that point there’s another conversation to be had about how the value of Bard scraping a video’s content could benefit creators – at the moment the only clear advantage is for Google. Are nothing new for generative AI, but it’s a question that everyone in the industry – including Google – hasn’t yet found an answer to. We’ve reached out to Google for clarification on this and will update this article with their response. Either way, if it wants YouTube creators to happily produce content for its platform, Google will eventually have to figure that out.

Update November 22 2:55 PM ET: A note has been added that we have contacted Google to request an explanation on the potential impact on YouTube creators.

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